Adult Safeguarding is Mostly Useless

As a user of social care services for over 25 years. I have had my fair share of adult safeguarding issues, and my overall conclusion is that it is a system that is mostly useless and at times harmful to those it claims to protect.

The claimed mission statement of adult safeguarding is to protect ‘vulnerable’ adults from abuse in all its forms. The reality is it is a system to manage claims of abuse within social care services. And by manage, this often means ensuring they are swept under the carpet.

Unless the abuse has resulted in visual attributes that can not be ignored, like obvious bruising that can not be explained away, the reaction of safeguarding investigators is to do as little as possible since the last thing they want is an ‘overreaction’. Their role is to avoid the police as far as possible since that is just an annoying amount of paperwork.

I am also discovering since I am labelled an independent service user because I have direct payments and a voice, it is assumed I can not be abused because I am not vulnerable enough as I always know what I am doing.

The thing is with abuse is that I would suggest in terms of interdependent relationships, most abuse is psychological and subtle because it is about the control of relationships. Not putting the amount of sugar in someone’s tea they like when they are dependent on someone else to do this could be seen as abuse because it is an abuse of power. It is symbolic of a bigger issue that should be investigated. But when we live in a society where it is assumed that ‘carers know best’, this type of abuse is not just ignored but rewarded.

The language of abuse is designed the trivialise the matter and to avoid matters being seen as the crimes they are. Vulnerable adults are financially, physically and sexually abused while the rest of the population is stolen from, assaulted and raped. Abuse of vulnerable adults is investigated by social workers with little accountability while crimes are investigated by the police with a level of confidence something will be done.

The understanding of how adult safeguarding is systematically designed to fail vulnerable adults gives a wider insight into the passivity industry. When so many people profit from keeping people with impairments and others passive and excluded from mainstream society due to a socially constructed interdependency, it makes perfect sense that any rebellion from accepting their oppression is managed in the way it is.

Therefore, my advice for anyone who has been abused in any way is not to involve social services as they will try to dismiss it. It is better to involve the police or with the assistance of family, friends or advocates, try to safely confront your abuser directly. There are many techniques I have developed to keep me safe which is included in my Understand Assistance guide.

If you like my blog article, have a look at some of my products;

Achieve Support – https://www.simonstevens.com/achievesupport
Having Pride (My Life Story) – http://www.balsy.me
Stevens’ Manifesto – https://www.simonstevens.com/manifesto
Understand Assistance – http://www.understand.tips
Understand Dysability – https://www.simonstevens.com/understanddysability
Understand Inclusion -https://www.simonstevens.com/understandinclusion

or visit my website at http://www.simonstevens.com

Donations are always gratefully received via paypal at https://www.paypal.me/simonstevens74
You can also email me at simon@simonstevens.com
or follow me on Twitter at @simonstevens74

We live in a society that rewards passivity

Passivity is the action of doing nothing when confronted with a problem to solve or an opportunity to grasp. It is often a learnt behaviour that passive individuals are not aware of themselves.

For myself, the problem is not so much that people are passive, but that society not only accepts passivity but that it rewards it. There is a huge industry made up of charities, political parties, the media and other organisations that rely on creating passive individuals and keeping people passive.

When someone is deemed to be passive, it is perceived they have a vulnerability to a whole range of abuse, and therefore they need their affairs looked after on their behalf by a charity or other well-wisher, often without their knowledge, permission or involvement.

Too many charities set themselves up as the saviours of a specific group like ‘the poor’, ‘the disabled’ or so on without any involvement of those they claim to represent. Their interest is solely their survival and their growth as employers of the middle class, where their directors are paid competitive six-figure salaries to trade in passivity.

Rather than helping those they claim to care about, they are merely keeping them passive so they remain helpful to the objectives of the charity. In this business model, the worst thing you can do is empower your power base so that the individuals you depend upon no longer need your help, doing yourself out of a job! Instead, charities need to ensure the goal they claim they want to achieve, like the end of poverty, is never achievable. The endless reports they produce portraying people as victims and blaming others like the government are simply designed to portray the issue as unachievable.

So the purpose of activities like employment support for people with impairments is to keep their clients out of work as long as possible so they can profit as much as possible. This means focusing on the negatives and ensuring they feel unable to do anything without the paid support of the charity.

For many years, I have understood this industry and tried to challenge its powerful hold on society. I believe people should be properly enabled and empowered to achieve the goals they want from life in a timeframe that works for them. If charities have a place in society, it should be as the running mates of individuals to supporting them to achieve, not as their modern day oppressors.

Before things can change, society needs to understand there is a problem to be solved and that charities are not the heroes but the villains in helping individuals. In the era of social media, the penny may drop at any moment and the realisation of a different viewpoint may quickly spread, where governments and others are then called upon to act for positive change. I hope that this moment comes sooner than later.

If you like my blog article, have a look at some of my products;

Achieve Support – https://www.simonstevens.com/achievesupport
Having Pride (My Life Story) – http://www.balsy.me
Stevens’ Manifesto – https://www.simonstevens.com/manifesto
Understand Assistance – http://www.understand.tips
Understand Dysability – https://www.simonstevens.com/understanddysability
Understand Inclusion -https://www.simonstevens.com/understandinclusion

or visit my website at http://www.simonstevens.com

Donations are always gratefully received via paypal at https://www.paypal.me/simonstevens74
You can also email me at simon@simonstevens.com
or follow me on Twitter at @simonstevens74

Why does supporting ALL disabled people earn you abuse and threats?

Those who have read my many blogs over the years will understand that I am very committed to improving the lives of all people with impairments in a meaningful way as fully contributing members of society, especially those with higher support needs. I believe this begins by believing everyone has a contribution to make, and therefore both a right and responsibility to participate as much as possible within society if they are to be considered good citizens, equal to everyone else.

The official line from the ‘disability movement’, which has been recently confirmed to me, is that people with impairments should only work if they want to, and that they should not be forced into work. The part about not being forced into work is used to justify their current opposition to meaningful inclusion which the current government is making small steps towards, and their support of the medical model exclusion of people with impairments as unfit for society, which is supported by most liberal and left wing activists and organisations.

The implications of ignoring social responsibility are for another article. The point I want to raise here is that since 2010, my simple belief that all people with impairments without exception have a meaningful place in society, as opposed to being simply paid benefits to sit at home doing nothing, has been met by abuse, intimidation and at times, even threats.

The left wing ‘disabled’ activists I have encountered on social media and in real life assume I lack any form of compassion towards people with impairments because I do not believe languishing on benefits for the rest of your life is the answer to providing ‘rights’. They see my commitment to meaningful inclusion as a vile act of betrayal that must be stopped because it does not fit into the victim culture they enjoy to wallow in.

These self-righteous activists certainly do not like the fact that I work full time as someone with a significant impairment, who also has chronic pain and mental health issues, because it weakens their argument that, as mostly mildly impaired activists, they are unfit for work and society because they have chosen to be.

In the same way Sajid Javid MP has disgustingly been recently called a Coconut and Uncle Tom because of his individual success as someone who is Asian, I have been called lucky and so on by activists try to excuse my own success as an anomaly that people with impairments should not expect or strive for.

The threats I have received for daring to be successful and instil an attitude of success in others have been subtle. Many times people have told me they hope that I have a bad benefit or social care assessment, based on the endless lies about the system they feed upon, so I have a ‘better understanding of what it is like to be disabled’ and to learn some compassion. This shows like any cult system, their belief system is so ingrained that they wish to harm those who oppose it.

Why does believing that all people with impairments have a place in society cause such hostility? It shows that the bigotry and prejudices people with impairments face by others, as well as themselves, remain a very complex and still highly misunderstood issue that is still many years away from being resolved and seen in the way I would like.

If you like my blog article, have a look at some of my products;

Achieve Support – https://www.simonstevens.com/achievesupport
Having Pride (My Life Story) – http://www.balsy.me
Stevens’ Manifesto – https://www.simonstevens.com/manifesto
Understand Assistance – http://www.understand.tips
Understand Dysability – https://www.simonstevens.com/understanddysability
Understand Inclusion -https://www.simonstevens.com/understandinclusion

or visit my website at http://www.simonstevens.com

Donations are always gratefully received via paypal at https://www.paypal.me/simonstevens74
You can also email me at simon@simonstevens.com
or follow me on Twitter at @simonstevens74